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Dive is IDM artist Tycho’s latest record released on Ghostly International. Tycho first entered the music world with a piece of work known as The Science of Patterns as a self-released EP in 2002. 2004 saw the release of his first full length entitled Sunrise Projector which is perhaps his most known work in the IDM community.

His second album dubbed Past is Prologue was released in ’06 on now defunct Florida-based Merck Records which was responsible for housing a lot of quality releases roughly in the same musical realm including works from Secede, Machinedrum, Mr. Projectile, and Helios.

This record in particular has the emotion and feeling that music from Ulrich Schnauss conveys while retaining a rhythm and structure that almost sounds like a vocal-less Zero 7 and an artist named Aerosol with Airborne all while sticking contently to an electronic-oriented background and atmosphere.

While Dive is vocal-less, it does sport minor vocal samples, most notably in its title track seen above.

Easily described as a feel-good album, Dive soars beyond what Tycho accomplished musically with previous records. While Past is Prologue as well as Sunrise Projector were solid no doubt, Dive feels like it was created effortlessly. It’s a straight forward record containing the easiness and relaxed atmosphere of Prologue while maintaining the striking eloquence of Tycho’s debut album.

Tycho’s work here is an outstanding testament to great IDM music and possesses long lasting appeal and virtually endless replayability.

For more information about the artist, check out the following resources:

Last.fm

Discogs

Ghostly International

Buy this release at:

Ghostly

Amazon

Download.

Alright, we’re back in business.

Videowave is the latest release from Kuedo (Jaime Teasdale). Along with another individual named Roly Porter, these two artists established a name for themselves by being early pioneers of the dubstep genre known under the Vex’d moniker. The duo’s latest venture together is in Cloud Seed also released on Planet Mu.

These two people together released a handful of releases on Planet Mu, helmed by Mike Paradinas. Mike also creates similar music himself under the µ-Ziq alias (pronounced “music”). This label has been responsible for some of the most vivid and imaginative electronic music released especially in recent years with acts like Machinedrum, Boxcutter, Solar Bears, iTAL tEK, Starkey, newcomer Chrissy Murderbot, and yes, Vex’d as well as µ-Ziq and more. It really is a testament to Mike Paradinas’s direction and leadership that the label is consistently putting out high quality releases like this.

Being an EP, this record has but a few tracks: a remix from Illum Sphere (who typically released on Fat City and a short stint on Dutch dj Martyn‘s 3024 label), a remix from Warp Records staple Chris Clark, and a remix from someone that I’m not familiar with who is called Heterotic (who nevertheless did a good job on his contribution to the EP).

The record does a great job of slicing and dicing complex beats – no surprise there given Vex’d track record in the past especially with hallmark album Degenerate released in ’05. Beyond that, intricately woven idm-esque sounds thrown down on punctual slabs of sub bass complete its short but adventurous stint barely breaking 19 minutes in duration.

Videowave opens with a song called Take Off which is a remix of an unreleased Slugabed track. It’s definitely more dancefloor oriented than everything else on the record and really sets the mood until its conclusion.

Perhaps the most sought after track here is Illum Sphere’s lovely remix of Starfox. Originally released on last year’s Dream Sequence EP (check it out), it is easy to ascertain that this is a fun loving track that contains a lot of crushed beats topped with a 8 bit arcade-esque adventure with a wonkyness that makes the sounds produced by artists like Machinedrum and Los Angeles-based Flying Lotus so desirable.

Learn more about the artist here:

Last.fm

Discogs

Planet Mu

And buy this release here:

Planet Mu

Download.

Room(s) is the latest record from Machinedrum and is released on heavyweight electronic label Planet Mu. The man behind Machinedrum, Andrew Stewart, has quite a few albums under his belt which were typically released on the now-defunct (but still awesome) Merck label, briefly moving over to the Normrex and LuckyMe labels for two full length releases.

Machinedrum and moreso this album in particular could quite easily be described as a fruitful blend between Flying Lotus, Prefuse 73, and even Autechre to a degree. Musical elements from all three of these kings of electronic music are present in this lusciously created album.

The upbeat nature of the record is emphasized by extraordinarily calculated beatwork while sounding incredibly effortless and unforgiving. The album moves fast with processed vocals dancing throughout energized drum machine beats. It is clear here that its author is heavily invested and influenced by the sort of glitchy/instrumental hip-hop sound that makes musicians like Flying Lotus mentioned above so popular.

Some people may find it tedious to overcome the vocal samples that are used repetitiously throughout the album, however if one looks at the finer details of Room(s), you may find yourself entranced with Stewart’s perfectionist methods of creating songs that somehow sound even more unique than the last. Plenty of booming sub-bass almost usurp other elements that are present in the record giving it a deep textural characterization that enhance the chaotic drum patterns and the effortlessly injected and playfully autotuned male/female vocal sampling.

It is obvious that Room(s) is a new take upon a genre of music that hasn’t seen a lot of coverage and innovation recently since being recognized in the early 1990s. Born out of Chicago, Ghetto house was/is this genre that really took on its own form with sparse use of synthesizers and 808/909 drum machines (among other elements). It was also referred to as Footwork or Juke. By the early 2000s, a lot of this type of sound was absorbed by many of the UK-based producers coming out recently and into a genre now known as dubstep pioneered by artists like DJ Distance.

I don’t know what makes this album as good as it is. Maybe it is the ruthless methods in which everything down to the sequencing is formed and organized. Maybe it’s the way the vocal samples intertwine perfectly with hip hop-esque beats between this wonky fusion of Prefuse 73-style state of the art production and a spacious and playful take on an old genre that has really breathed new life into this type of music.

In the end, Room(s) happens to be one of the most fresh and innovative records of the year authored by one of the most creative individuals in the business.

For more information, check out the following resources:

Last.fm

Discogs

Planet Mu

Buy this at:

Planet Mu

Bleep

Download.

It’s Artificial is the very recently released debut album from the US-based artist Andrew Bayer on the trance stronghold Anjunabeats label. Bayer’s background contains a lot of roots in trance and other electronic-oriented music. He has collaborated with fellow musicians Boom Jinx and BT (“The Emergency) in the past, producing formidable results. However, he is mostly known for his work in a duo trance act dubbed Signalrunners with partner-in-music Alan Nimmo. With Nimmo, he is responsible for some really fantastic sounds under the Signalrunners alias since its inception in 2003. The duo also released a nicely composed single called Unconditional in 2006 on Mondo Records.

However, as a solo artist, It’s Artificial is his debut album released not too long ago this year. And although the background of Bayer is deeply rooted in trance music, this album does not contain so much of those elements typically found in that genre. Instead, the record penetrates the glitch-hop realm of the music world heavily infused with elements found in idm and breakbeat-based work. The record would fit perfectly within Ninja Tune’s catalog or even Planet Mu, just to give you an idea of what you might expect within.

“Counting the Points”, as linked above, almost has a certain µ-Ziq-quality to it, especially heard within its beginning.

Armed with a seemingly hypnotic glitch-hop framework, the record effortlessly provides ample replayability value with extraordinary craftsmanship and a BT-like attention to detail. I think it’s rather impressive considering the album’s gorgeous versatility, although perhaps to some it may not immediately be apparent.

With his debut, Andrew Bayer has created a work so composed and intricate, that it may stand to rival heavyweight albums in the same genre. Spacious vocal-less breakbeats with glitch-hop? Yes please.

For more information, please check out the following resources:

Last.fm

Discogs

Anjunabeats blog

If you like the record, do yourself a favor and buy it at:

Beatport

Audiojelly

Amazon

Download.

posted by Unctuous

Shobaleader One is a new project fronted by Squarepusher, and includes other anonymous members. Wielding plenty of vocoders and Squarepusher’s signature funky bass guitar, this release also adds elements of electro, and IDM. The music embraces a lazy, retro feel with minimal, downtempo drum patterns and sharp, syncopated synths, yet reminiscent of “Just a Souvenir.” Cool melodies move sweetly with a lot of funk and jazz backing from the guitars in the tracks “Into the Blue” and “Frisco Waves” while harmonized, vocoded vocals add depth and fluidity. Anybody listening to this album may immediately think Daft Punk, but Tom Jenkinson’s jazzy influences and relaxed feel would strike any listener as something unique.

“Megazine” sums up the album quite well with the focus being upbeat, catchy and danceable. The album sets one particular mood and sticks with it. In that respect it can also be considered more minimalist; the sounds and instrumentation are generally kept the same and plod along lazily from one track to the next, it actually makes for a really great album to drive to.

There’s not a whole lot to report about this album, but I highly recommend listening to this one if you happen to like any of Squarepusher’s other releases. You shouldn’t be disappointed.

More info at:

Shobaleader One Website

Last.fm

Discogs

Buy this release at:

Bleep

Amazon

Download.

posted by admin

PQ is Maarten Vandewalle and Samir Bekaert from Belgium. Their debut album entitled You’ll Never Find Us Here was released this year on the UK-based label Expanding Records. The album draws from a good deal of inspirations and genres, mainly focusing on idm and ambient, though to a much lesser degree than one would normally think when referring to those styles of music.

This album makes good use of the guitar, but texturally, there’s not too much going on, a fact that sits quite well with this author. Sparse rhythms and easy going melodies come and go while minimal effects dance hazily across the record’s background. Muted effects make up a decent-sized portion of the album’s soundscape, much similar to Xela‘s excellent early 2007 album For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights, except this favor’s more guitar as its primary method of musical “cultivation”, as I like to put it.

The beginning of the album sees the occasional whispered beeps and bloops typically seen in the idm style of music, however the track mainly sways calmly into more of the ambient side of things, lightly speaking. The whole album isn’t really IDM, even though it fancies some elements taken from that genre; likewise, it also isn’t very ambient, even though, indeed, it features elements sported from that genre as well.

The album opens with A Taste of Diminished Expectation, which gradually turns out to be an hazily lulling experience that serves to give you a very general idea of what the rest of the album will be about. The second track is where the guitar is introduced, playing a wonderfully content set of notes until its conclusion.

A short, melancholic piano piece is played prior to entering the album’s 4th track, dubbed “Jocelyn”. Crisp, light-hearted effects are introduced in the midst of other instrumentation, serving as the musical tour-de-force that is only exemplified further throughout the rest of the record. The next track features a small child singing to a guitar-based background, which becomes a charmingly elegant song that fits in cozily with the rest of the album.

“Will You Still Be There?”  sports sparsely used samples consisting of small children having fun at distant, muted playground equipment while the romantic guitar play work introduces itself again by kicking out an acoustic melody of sorts accompanied by a thin ambient atmosphere.

The album ends with a reworked version of “Somebody Should Repeat My Summer”, a decidedly bassy remix with some of the more elegant effects seen previously mixed in. I think it was a very classy way to end the record (which is just shy of an hour in duration).

Most of the tracks here feature romantic acoustic guitar work as the album’s driving force peppered in combination with other effects. The guitar adds quite a bit of fresh air into the album, but the real beauty is realized in the warmth and cohesiveness of the record. Indeed, perhaps its single greatest quality is in its gracefulness. Highly recommended.

For more information, check out:

Last.fm

Soundcloud

Discogs

This album is available to purchase:

Boomkat

Amazon

Bleep

Download.

posted by admin

‘sup guys?

I’m really not sure how to start this one off. When I first heard Tryshasla, it came off immediately as one of the finest records that I had ever had the pleasure of listening to – a sentiment that still remains to this day.

Not necessarily straying too far from brother-album Tryshasla in terms of sound and structure, Secede (aka Lennard van der Last) managed quite successfully in creating a piece of work that compliments his ability to aurally paint wonderfully detailed soundscapes that explode with vibrancy in Silent Flower Observers.

Cliché or not, the man has an intriguing signature that I haven’t been quite able to find in other artists within the same musical vein. It doesn’t really take much time to ascertain and make sense of how the man puts his feelings and thoughts onto the record. He even sings in some of these tracks; quite low key and “private”-like.

Much like Tryshasla, Silent Flower Observers doesn’t really have any primary backbone as far as pure musical structure – the sounds heard within this album subscribe to spontaneity and not too much more. Wonderful pads accompany tasteful vocal sampling and warm beatwork, ultimately coming together to create a wholly unified and magical work of art.

In reality, a wide range of sounds can be heard upon entering the daydream world of Secede’s records. From the distant, threatlessness of thunderstorms opening to an audience at (in my mind) a magic show clapping in appreciation to a magician’s trick. The nature of this album means that it can contently and quietly enables its listener’s imagination to soar to stratospheric heights as a result of its expansive, lighthearted dreamworld.

The general consensus is that Secede’s breakthrough musical moment is with the release of Tryshasla (very much a defining and heavily influential album within the idm/electronic music world), however Silent Flower Observers seems to be a bit overlooked, maybe as a result of the fact that the man himself canceled it for reasons not currently known (even the Sending Orbs website offers just a vague one-liner sentence on this subject).

Unavailable physically, unfortunately.

P.S, I’m already seeing that this post could be written a bit better, but give me some time and I’m sure I’ll reconnect with my vocabulary sooner or later.

Check out the following links for more information:

Last.fm

Discogs

– Clothes HQ post on Secede’s Tryshasla

Download.

i slept in these clothes

Hi guys. Since January, I have consistently received a healthy amount of email regarding the status of Clothes HQ and whether or not I’ll be coming back to post once more (which is totally awesome). I’ve also been asked often whether or not I can “review” new material from budding artists and labels.

Well, it should be apparent by my Last.fm listening activity that I am alive and well. And although pageviews have gradually decreased since our hiatus at the end of January this year, I find that I am still getting a decent amount of them which seems to indicate that the Internet just isn’t finished with this little page on the corner of the web.

Something to note is that my music tastes have shifted a bit into more of a house direction. This may or may not affect how much I potentially post from that genre. I still listen to a lot of idm, dnb, trance, dubstep, and what not though. And if I do start up again (based on feedback that I will get via email/comments), I’m going to need help on this post.

Sooo. What do you think? I appreciate any and all input. Email me or post a comment below (not sure why people would rather email me over posting below btw :p).

In 2009, Stendeck released “Sonnambula.” “Sonnambula” creates a unique environment in which the music transports the listener to different points in this environment. Glossy, celestial, interweaving chords are laced with glitches and distorted beats and makes for a listen with surprises at every new phrase, and new aural territory explored and exploited. Stendeck takes the almost polar opposites of electronic music and fuses them into a form that pushes boundaries of IDM, industrial, and ambient. The music emits a very personal, touching message through heartfelt, melancholic synths as heard in “Hunters of the Last Summer Breeze.” It draws the listener out this world, and into space for a view of the tiny specks of light millions of lightyears away.

With sounds that seem to tear at ones emotions, “Safari in the Blue Tails Cockatoo’s Garden” is an extremely powerful piece. From the second that screaming, piercing, guitar-like instrument bursts into the music it’s as though being catapulted through cascades of falling stars all around you, and the light from these stars pierces deep into your heart, and cleansing the mind, and simply filled with an entire spectrum of sounds at one time.

Over the course of the album, abstract thoughts and ideas contort and twist, evolve and grow to carry the listener to worlds unknown, and places undiscovered. With every listen this album becomes more and more enjoyable as, continually, different sounds emerge, and new interpretations can be made.

More information at:

Stendeck at Tympanik Audio

Last.fm

Discogs

Myspace

Buy this release at:

Tympanik Audio

Amazon

Download.

posted by admin

For Frosty Mornings and Summer Nights is a reissue of Type Records-signed Xela’s debut album, originally released on the now-defunct Neo Ouija label. This release comes with two bonus tracks (track 12 “A Glance” and track 13, “Danse Macabre”).

The first two or three tracks is the most upbeat this album gets. “Under the Glow of Streetlights”, seen in the video below, is the second track out of the album containing some great glitch effects set to a nice beat. However, as you progress throughout the record, it starts to get a bit more cold.

Track 04’s In Between Two Rooms exemplifies this: glitchy effects, but more calculated and distant. Cackles fizz in and out of existence while other IDM-esque effects pepper the background. Towards the end of the track, you can almost hear samples of rain drops being applied here but warped in such a way where it barely makes an impression. Subtle, but very worthwhile.

“Impulsive Behaviour” could be seen as a sort of a sequel to the previous “In Between Two Rooms”. While the beat work plays more of a role, the textures are characterized by yet more fizzles and then elaborated upon by winded software-based instrumentation, creating somewhat of a deep distance between the two. There are of course some ambient-esque sounds, however IDM is one of predominant structural foundations of which most of this record is based upon.

The middle of the album sees An Abandoned Robot, a bit of a departure from the previous mainly downtempo tracks in that it employs primarily bass as a driving force to move to song onward (as opposed to strictly glitch and other IDM effects seen in the first few tracks). A relatively high-pitched sound gradually emerges and fades as the bass continues to provide the backdrop to the track. Soon, it is content to let the high pitch (I use that term lightly) sound slide out of existence, ultimately driving the song to its conclusion.

“The Long Walk Home at Midnight” sees the return of glitch as the primary motivation to move itself onward and upward. This represents a change in the album in the sense that all of the beat work, effects, and structure all come together to do something a bit different. This song is very streamlined. Bass plays more of a role (uncharacteristically) compared to all songs before it. New effects emerge, but the distant, vocalless, downtempo-esque, and yet the certain melancholic feeling still remains rather comfortably.

Ultimately, this album has incredibly high replayability value. The two bonus tracks are very fitting to the rest of the record, making for a very well rounded and seasoned soundscape. Track 12’s “Danse Macabre” almost becomes a bit melodic toward its ending – inserting a large bit of fresh air to everything. The bottom line is that the album’s title is very appropriate for the kind of sounds that you’ll find (and enjoy) in here. Highly recommended.

For more information, check out:

Last.fm

Discogs

– Artist page @ Type Records

Buy this digitally at:

Boomkat

Emusic

Download.

(P.S, sorry about no post yesterday).